Jul 9, 2009
General
caxias
Kenya Petroleum Refineries Ltd has completed scheduled maintenance of a crude distillation unit at a cost of Sh250 million within a month.
Kenya Petroleum Refineries Ltd has completed scheduled maintenance of a crude distillation unit at a cost of Sh250 million within a month.

The work, which involved the shutdown and repair of the unit that started on June 1, went without fuel shortage being experienced in the country.

The refinery has two units processing about 8,500 metric tones of crude oil daily.

According to the refinery’s communications manager Martin Wahome, Sh250 million went into the work of complex I that ended on July 3. He said the next shutdown for the unit should be from 2013 to 2014.

Full capacity

“Shutdowns are programmed in cycles of four to five years. Complex I start up is expected by this weekend and production by early next week.

Complex II is due for maintenance in 2011 or 2012 as it was shutdown back in 2007,” he said.

Throughout the whole of May, KPRL operated at maximum capacity to provide adequate stocks of locally refined fuel in preparation of complex I shut down.

Marketing firms which are the main refinery users were informed months in advance of the intended exercise.

The companies consequently, took steps to import additional refined fuel.

Gapco on May 21 under the open tender system, submitted the lowest bid to import 14,500 MT of petrol and 35,380 MT of jet fuel A-1.

It was awarded the tender to import on behalf of the industry through Kipevu Oil Terminal in Mombasa the petrol and jet fuel A-1 after bidding $15.60 and $15.90 per MT respectively as basis of freight and premium.

Main drivers

“The main drivers were our own personnel from Kenya although experts from South Africa, Britain, Netherlands, India and Ivory Coast also took part in the exercise,” said Mr Wahome.

Completion of maintenance comes in the wake of consultants’ recommendation to the Energy Regulatory Commission urging that Kenya Pipeline Company builds truck loading facilities in Mombasa and Nairobi.

“A barrier to competition is unequal access to supply depot services to the coastal and Nairobi market regions as one moves out of the KPC logistics system,” said Mercado’s Energy Markets International (Spain), Houston & Associates (Canada) and Aberdare Engineering Ltd (Kenya).
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